The Landscape of Azores Islands

The Landscape of Azores Islands
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

The eastern islands of Azores Archipelago, Flores and Corvo, and the southern parts of Santa Maria and Terceira, closest to the African mainland, have desert-like vegetation, scrubby, with lots of cacti and succulents. Most typical of these parts is the Cardon, a candelabre-shaped cactus belonging to the Euphorbia family, named after Euphorbus physician to King Juba II of Mauretania who sent an expedition to the Azores in 30 BC.

Everywhere there are gardens and parks, full of exotic species from the Tropics and familiar plants from Northern Europe, some of them so established and successful that they have become local 'trademarks', like the bird of paradise flower (strelitzia) and the poinsettia, which grows to almost tree-like proportions.

Patios and roadsides, windowsills and street corners alike are ablaze with colour, scarlet geraniums, purple and orange bougainvillea, rosy hibiscus and camellias, night-scented white datura and palm trees waving glossy green fronds. It's a feast for the eyes.

The islands' fauna is less abundant, but it too has some interesting evolutionary survivals, especially among the lizards, though the famous giant lizards of Hierro have died out, leaving only fossilized remains and smaller descendants.

There are no poisonous snakes to worry about, only a few scorpions and mosquitoes. Rabbits, hares and feral goats were clearly originally introduced by man, the wild dogs that King Juba II's expedition found here have long since been assimilated in the domestic dog population, though some observers claim to see occasional throwbacks.

Among the native bird species, the best known is of course the canary (Serinus canaria). The wild bird is not the 'canary yellow' colour we're accustomed to, it's a drab little finch with merely a touch of yellow on its underparts, and it was named after the islands, not the other way round.

There are distinct sub-species of several other familiar birds, such as the sparrow, chiffchaff and grey wagtail, some varying even between the islands, like the blue tit, and once again Mount Teide has a unique species all of its own, the blue chaffinch (Fringilla teydea). Pigeons, partridges and quail apparently survive the annual shooting seasons to populate the forests and particularly the hills of Flores.

0
Like
Save

Comments

Comments are disabled for this post.